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Discover English idioms about friendship and Relationships in the article.This article presents ten English idioms about friendship and relationships, along with example sentences, which can be particularly beneficial for English learners.

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Friendship Idioms

Let’s begin with our compilation of top English idioms related to friendship:

1. Build bridges

This expression denotes the act of enhancing relationships between individuals who significantly differ or hold dislike for one another, often used with “between.”

For example, A local charity organisation is working to build bridges between different ethnic groups in the city.

2. Friends in high places

This phrase indicates having friends in high places, particularly those with significant or influential positions.

For example, Jim is very rude to other workers just because he has some friends in high places.

3. Be an item

This phrase is used to describe individuals who are romantically involved or in a dating relationship.

For example, Kate and Richard began seeing each other and were an item for almost two years.

4. At odds with someone

This is used to describe individuals who are in conflict or disagreement. The term “odds” refers to controversy, inequality, or probabilities in this context.

For example, The director and the artist were always at odds while making that short film

5. Cross someone’s path – unexpectedly meet someone

Initially, this phrase suggested that such a encounter involved opposing or causing trouble for someone, but in its contemporary usage, it may not necessarily imply that.

For example, Ann swore she would scream if a spider crossed her path.

6. A friend in need is a friend indeed

A genuine friend is someone who offers support when we’re facing challenges or going through tough times, unlike others who vanish in times of difficulty.

For example, Mary has lost her keys, so she has nowhere to stay for the night, but Emma suggested that she stay at her place. A friend in need is a friend indeed.

7. Make friends

This phrase should not be interpreted literally since the act of “making” friends is not feasible. Instead, it signifies forming a friendship with someone or developing warm feelings for them.

For example, I hope John will soon make friends at school because he feels so lonely now.

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8. Cross someone’s path – unexpectedly meet someone

Originally, this phrase suggested that such an encounter involved opposing or causing trouble for someone. However, in its contemporary sense, it may not necessarily imply the same adversarial connotation.

For example, Ann swore she would scream if a spider crossed her path.

9. A friend in need is a friend indeed

A genuine friend is someone who provides assistance when we’re facing challenges or going through tough times, unlike others who vanish when difficulties arise.

For example, Mary has lost her keys, so she has nowhere to stay for the night, but Emma suggested that she stay at her place. A friend in need is a friend indeed.

10. Make friends

This expression should not be interpreted literally as the act of “making” friends is not achievable. Instead, it signifies forming a friendship with someone or cultivating warm feelings for them.

For example, I hope John will soon make friends at school because he feels so lonely now.

What is your English level?

Find out your A1 A2 B1 B2 C1 C2 level of English with our quick, free online test.