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While ‘I want’ is the primary phrase that comes to mind when expressing a desire for something, it’s not the sole means of conveying a wish in English. Although it’s the most direct approach, our aim is to go beyond basic English, isn’t it?

Today, we’ll explore various English expressions commonly used by native speakers in daily conversations. There are numerous alternatives to ‘I want,’ and these phrases can add depth and color to your English communication.

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I would like some water, please

“‘Would like’ is a more courteous way to convey a desire compared to ‘want.’ It’s frequently used in questions when someone offers you something. For instance: ‘Would you like some tea?’ – ‘Yes, please.'”

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I feel like having some chocolate

When it comes to conveying a desire for something, ‘I want’ is likely the initial phrase that comes to mind. Nonetheless, it’s not the exclusive method to express a wish in English. While it’s the most direct approach, we aim to communicate in more than just basic English, don’t we?

Today, we will explore various English expressions commonly used by native speakers in their everyday conversations. There are numerous alternatives to saying ‘I want,’ and integrating these phrases into your English can add richness and variety to your speech.

 

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I am craving a coffee

“If you have a strong desire for something, like a chocolate or coffee, and it’s making your mouth water, you can use this English expression.
For instance: ‘I have a strong craving for a large, succulent steak!'”

I’m dying for a cup of doughnut

This phrase is applicable when you’ve had a prolonged desire for something but haven’t been able to fulfill it, and now it’s become extremely urgent!
For example: ‘I’ve been longing for chocolate doughnut.

I feel like a hamburger

Don’t worry; this phrase doesn’t imply that you have emotions resembling a hamburger (although that could be amusing). This English expression means ‘I want to eat a hamburger.’ You can substitute the word ‘hamburger’ with any other noun.
For instance: ‘Shall we dine out tonight?’ – ‘Certainly! I have a craving for hamburger.’

Hit the spot

The final English expression we have today to convey a desire is more than just a phrase; it’s actual slang. It signifies that you’ve obtained something you desired or needed.

For instance: ‘Mmm… that incredible slice of cheesecake was exactly what I wanted. Thanks, Jenny!’

That’s all for today. What expressions for expressing desire do you use when conversing in English? I look forward to your responses in the comments.

What is your English level?

Find out your A1 A2 B1 B2 C1 C2 level of English with our quick, free online test.