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Are you eager to acquire a fresh set of vocabulary for discussing movies? Explore a plethora of phrasal verbs that will enable you to express yourself effectively in English when talking about films. Dive in and enhance your English conversation skills!

There are countless captivating films, and one could easily spend many hours discussing them.

Frequently, movies are based on books, sparking another intriguing debate: Which is superior, the book or the movie?

Take, for instance, one of my cherished films, the renowned “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” directed by Milos Forman. It is an adaptation of the book of the same name by Ken Kesey. In such cases, determining whether the book or the movie is better proves challenging.

What’s your favorite movie?

Can you discuss it in English? If you can, that’s wonderful!

But if you’re unsure about what to say, this article is tailored for you. It will introduce you to numerous words and expressions to help you feel more confident when talking about your favorite film in English.

 

What is your English level?

Find out your A1 A2 B1 B2 C1 C2 level of English with our quick, free online test.

To start off, let’s recall the various categories of film genres:

  •         Romantic comedy (sometimes shortened to “Romcom”)
  •         Science fiction (sci-fi)
  •         Horror (scary movie)
  •         Documentary
  •         Animated film (animation)
  •         Action / thriller
  •         Drama
  •         Comedy
  •         Adventure

At times, various genres are merged in a single film, making it challenging to precisely categorize it. In such cases, we might describe it, for instance, as a drama with elements of action.

How was the movie?

This is the initial question we pose to our friend upon leaving the theater. And now you’re familiar with how to ask it in English!

Here are a few alternative ways to respond to that question:

– It was heartwarming and an absolute riot.
(*this indicates it was very funny)

– The special effects were awe-inspiring.

– It sent shivers down my spine.
(*this idiom means that it was very frightening)

– It provided food for thought.
(*this means that it gave you something to think about)

– The plot was captivating.
(*the idea, concept, story)

If you didn’t enjoy the movie, or if you found it uninteresting, you can use these expressions:

– The movie was exceptionally bad/boring.

– It was like watching the grass grow.
(*this idiom means that the movie was uninteresting and boring)

– It was like watching paint dry.
(*this idiom means the same as “watching the grass grow.”)

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In conclusion, here are some English terms related to movies:

Cast – the ensemble of actors in the film

Veteran – an actor with extensive experience

Dubbed – translated into another language, especially for audio

Subtitles – written text at the bottom of the screen corresponding to the dialogue

Cinematography – the art of capturing images in filmmaking, encompassing camera work and the creation of moving visuals on the screen; it also refers to the film industry itself

Trailer – a brief preview that showcases several scenes from a film and outlines the basic plot

Sequel – a movie that continues the storyline of a previous one

Cameo – a brief appearance or small character role in a movie, often portrayed by a well-known actor or celebrity

Blockbuster – a highly popular and financially successful film

Bombed – past tense verb, indicating that a film was of poor quality and experienced financial failure

View English-language films to enhance your listening skills. Subsequently, discuss the films in English with your friends, family, and colleagues. Practice conversational English without fear of making mistakes—simply start speaking!

What is your English level?

Find out your A1 A2 B1 B2 C1 C2 level of English with our quick, free online test.